Kevah: ParshaNut

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DAY OF THE DEAD - Parshat Shelach

Posted by David Kasher on 15 June 2017 | Comments

There were so many. How did they all die?

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WHEN OPPOSITES ATTACK - Parshat BeHa'alotcha

Posted by David Kasher on 8 June 2017 | Comments

The boy came running out of the camp, and he looked panicked. Moses and Joshua, standing near the Tent of Meeting, turned to him, wondering what was wrong. He caught his breath and blurted out:

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ONE FINE DAY - Parshat Naso

Posted by David Kasher on 2 June 2017 | Comments

I remember the day I fell in love with parshanut.

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FLAGS OF LOVE AND WAR - Parshat Bamidbar

Posted by David Kasher on 25 May 2017 | Comments

What’s the big deal with burning a flag? A flag is just a symbol of the state, after all; it isn’t the state itself. Who cares if someone wants to set a colored piece of cloth on fire? 

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THE SECRET OF THE WORLD - Parshat Behar-Bechukotai

Posted by David Kasher on 19 May 2017 | Comments

Leviticus just never lets up. 

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SOLOMON'S SPLENDOR - Parshat Emor

Posted by David Kasher on 12 May 2017 | Comments

No hunchbacks on the altar.

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A JEWISH CAUSALITY DILEMMA - Parshat Tazria-Metzora

Posted by David Kasher on 27 April 2017 | Comments

Which came first: the chicken, or the egg?

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THE PATH OF HOLINESS - Parshat Shemini

Posted by David Kasher on 20 April 2017 | Comments

What is holiness?

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NOT BY MATZAH ALONE - Parshat Tzav

Posted by David Kasher on 6 April 2017 | Comments

It is not difficult to come up with a connection between Passover and Parshat Tzav. For it is here in Leviticus, deep in the arcane laws of the priestly sacrifices, that we reencounter a substance familiar to us from the Exodus. Every day in the Temple, we read, there were both animal sacrifices and grain sacrifices. The most basic form of the latter – the Minkhah – was partially burnt on the altar, and then the remainder was eaten by the priests, as follows:

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