Kevah: ParshaNut

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OPEN THE FLOODGATES - Parshat Noach

Posted by David Kasher on 18 October 2017 | Comments

You’ll never guess my favorite line in the Torah.

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A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE - Parshat Ha'azinu

Posted by David Kasher on 20 September 2017 | Comments

Moses has rocks on the brain.

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MAY YOU LIVE TO 120 - Parshat Nitzavim-Vayeilech

Posted by David Kasher on 14 September 2017 | Comments

“May you live until a hundred and twenty!” 

One of the most classic Jewish blessings, this phrase has found its way into several languages.  If you have Yiddish-speaking grandparents, you may have heard it as ביז הונדערט און צוואַנציק (biz hundert un tzvantsig)!  In modern Israel, it became popular once again as עד מאה ועשרים (ad meah ve’esrim)!

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WANDERING JEWS AND SYRIANS - Parshat Ki Tavo

Posted by David Kasher on 7 September 2017 | Comments

Where exactly does our national story begin?

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KINGS OF FLESH AND BLOOD - Parshat Shoftim

Posted by David Kasher on 24 August 2017 | Comments

Monarchy is one of the most fiercely debated topics in all of Jewish law and literature. On the one hand, we have a long and storied tradition of kings ruling over ancient Israel - chief among them King David, a paragon of passion and piety, and one of the great heroes of the Hebrew Bible. Even our concept of the messiah is traditionally understood not as some supernatural being, but a human king whose reign will usher in an era of utopian peace.

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THE BODY POLITIC - Parshat Re'eh

Posted by David Kasher on 17 August 2017 | Comments

What do parents want most for their children?

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THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN... - Parshat Eikev

Posted by David Kasher on 10 August 2017 | Comments

We begin with a word. 

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A MATTER OF INTERPRETATION - Parshat Va'etchanan

Posted by David Kasher on 3 August 2017 | Comments

Midrash, the rabbinic method of interpreting the verses of the Torah, always begins with a problem in the text. Something about the way the verse is written is strange or confusing, has missing or extra words or letters, or is inconsistent with some other verse. Such verses, as the rabbis described them, are virtually calling out to us, “Darsheini - Interpret me!” Midrash, then, is first and foremost an exercise in problem-solving.

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